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Connecting people to place through contemporary Canadian cuisine, Canoe crafts inspired dishes reflective of our country’s diverse landscape, history and culture.

Our chefs work closely with farmers and suppliers to source the finest ingredients from across the nation.

With over 20 years of culinary history, Canoe continues to challenge creative boundaries in the spirit of celebrating Canada and its distinct provinces.

Instead, they were taxed for being denied the right to serve their country...

The impossibility of a Jew serving in the Russian military did not come at the request of the Jewish community but from Russian law, [which was] designed to prevent Jews from serving their country...

Any contrary position would have forced the Russian oligarchy into giving Jews a measure of political equality, [which] they had no intention of doing...

(In some countries where it was forbidden for Jews to serve in the armed forces, their absence in the armies was offered as evidence that Jews were cowards, unwilling to fight for their country.) According to Leeson, the levy called for ten Jewish males to be selected out of every thousand Jews of the population each year, while only seven gentile males were to be drafted out of every thousand gentiles every two years.

A military code redacted in 1864 contained no special clauses with regard to Jews, but in 1876 a law was passed decreeing that every Jewish draftee who was unfit for duty was to be replaced by another Jew from the same precinct.

Additional rubrics stipulated that the family of any Jew who evaded military service was to be fined 300 rubles, while anyone who captured a Jewish draft-evader was to be rewarded 50 rubles in cash.

In addition, Jewish communities were compelled to provide one conscript for every 1,000 rubles of debt owed to the government in back-taxes.

According to Leeson, The entire subject of conscription of Jews into the Russian army cannot be divorced from the apparently overwhelming desire of the Russian oligarchy to convert all Jews to Christianity.

Many measures were instituted to accomplish that end, including: (1) the endowment of all rights accorded to Christians to any baptized Jew of the same rank; (2) the exemption from taxes for three years [for] any Jewish convert; (3) the establishment of obligatory military service for Jews as well as Christians.